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20130101
20130131
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CSPAN2 9
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
will -- will not. >> and argentine navy ship detained in ghana has finally returned home. imran khan at this report. >> she arrived to a full blown celebration, finally, after being detained for two months in ghana. the triumphant return was watched by the argentine president. her ship was detained after a claim was filed by a wealthy investor allegedly -- alleging argentina reneged on a deal involving bonds. the u.n. stepped in and ordered the detention illegal. fernandez welcomed the ship was in no mood to reach a deal with the investment fund which she said took advantage of the argentinian financial crisis. >> these old church funds that tried to -- vulture funds, this is the 28 embargo the tried to carry out. they are the product of this global economic crisis that can be defined as an anarchist capitalism, where there is
to the african continent where she visited liberia, ghana and the ivory coast. the primary mission of the trip was to participate in the inauguration of william holder, the new president of liberia. for the first time, the first lady would be the official representative of the united states. as such, pat met privately with the president as well as prime e prime minister and the president of ghana and the president -- sorry, of the ivory coast. i think i just murdered their names, for which i apologize. her official party of 40 included the reverend billy graham. he and tolbert were both ministers, and mrs. john h. johnson, the wife of the president of johnson publishing company. in addition to official meetings, press conferences and speeches before political parties, the africans treated pat and her entourage to a whirlwind of dippers, receptions -- dippers, receptions and presentations. pat took her responsibilities on the trip very seriously. duly noted in the biography that pat snuck away on christmas day to go over her briefing notes to organize her thoughts for the upcoming trip. althoug
, and ghana participating as well. 2000 troops from chad. thousands of african troops are expected to support the french and malian forces. they are appealing for help particularly from european countries for logistical as well as financial help to support the mission in support of the mali government. >> thank you. al-shabab says it has killed a suspected french spy at the center of a failed rescue mission earlier this week. denis allex was captured in 2009. the somali rebel group said it killed him on its twitter feeds. the french agent was once thought to have been killed on saturday. two french soldiers died in the rescue attempt. qatar airways is the latest airline to ground depletes of five boeing 787 dreamliner planes. all but four of the dreamliner jets in the world have stopped flying after a series of mechanical and electrical failures. dreamliner made its debut and in 2011. ana getting the first periodit has grounded all of its dreamliner jets. japan has 14 of them in a hangar. united airlines operates six of the jets. also grounded, air india's 6. chilean and a polish airliner are
to the huge amount of water that is devoted to growing these unused crops. here in ghana, families are making use of every grade they've got but in many less developed countries, food is wasted because of poor harvesting, transport, and storage facilities. in some countries, a report says 80% of the rice produced is lost each year although the buyers insist progress is being made. >> we do a lot working with farmers in developing countries, both in the production of food -- like use of water -- but also storage when it comes off the field to ensure more of it gets on the shelves and is not wasted. >> but there is also still a problem with both your countries, oil with supermarkets rejecting perfectly edible fruit of vegetables because they are just the wrong size or don't look like a good look right. retailers say they are complying with do you regulations but this is still waste. many consumers buy much more than they can eat. although campaigners say britain is an example of a nation trying to do better. >> the great british public have actually reduced the amount they are throwing away by
when he visited ghana in 2009 and where our president stated that in the long runs the africans who are best able and best capable of addressing africa's challenges. that often gets condensed in the shorthand of african solutions to african problems, but it's an important principle. secretary clinton last year on one of her many trips to africa expanded upon president obama's views and said, yes, africa's solutions for african problems, but increasingly global problems require african solutions as well. and i think what secretary clinton was getting at is that, is that africa's no longer isolated. africa's part of a broader global community, and the african countries have a role to play and have contributions to make. so those principles, i think, are quite important for us as we think about what it is that we're supposed to do on behalf of our country. um, we're guided, also, in addition to those two principles, there are two overarching documents, united states government documents that help shape our activities. the first is the presidential policy directive on sub-saharan africa
, july 2010. so, we have something in common. you made a trip to ghana, you write about that in the book. going to ghana, going to stand in that space where potentially your an an -- ancestors, african slaves, may have come from. >> my goodness. the reason why i had the opportunity to go i had applied for a kellogg scholarship and didn't think i would get it, but during the time of the interview, one person asked me, shirley, is there something you've always wanted to do and you never had chance to do? i said, yes. i always wanted to go to africa. he said, where. i said, ghana. so, the first thing i did after i was notified i had the scholarship and could start traveling, i went to ghana, and i was so excited that couldn't sleep. i was just -- the thought of getting to africa, you know, a place where my ancestors came from, i couldn't -- it was just more -- i can't describe what i was feeling, and i just couldn't wait to get there, and to ask them, you know, what do you think of african-americans, and i asked everybody. >> it's interesting because in all the travels, that's what you se
countries said they, too, would send help. it was togo, ghana, and senegal, all sending troops. at the same time, they said they would let them use air space. today, it is now an attack, a major hostage situation involving civilians from a bunch of other countries, civilians including americans. it happened in a algeria, and americans and others were taken at a natural gas facility, bp. they were from ireland, canada, and france. the natural gas facility was here in a remote area of northeastern algeria, the group claiming responsibility says it was retaliation for them using air space in maly. he has reportedly struck out on his own now. according to the algerian government, the hostage-takers were traveling in three cars with lots of guns and first tried to attack a bus, transporting employees who worked there. when that failed, they reportedly went to the place where the employees were housed. it was there they were able to take 20 to 40 people hostage, including americans. there were many, many algerians who work at the plant, as well, but they were being released as the hostage-takers
to india and ghana and all these places to get material and people were telling me but you know, she had some papers under her bed, in her house. so part of what i tell is this gradual process by which gained access to those materials. >> host: how did you do it because -- >> guest: it took time. >> host: some of these were interested in a lot -- but she had them in her home. >> guest: that is a part of it. when he decided -- >> host: now he is the older -- he's the younger son of dr. king? >> guest: sees the older, the younger son, yes, i'm sorry. >> host: two sons and two daughters. >> guest: he is the younger son and he had decided that he wanted to bring them all together and put them up for auction. so at that point the question became what's going to happen with all the papers in the home. and that is when i began to go through all of these materials. and i found that there were extraordinary rich. they opened up a whole new dimension about martin luther king because they had to deal with his life as a minister. you could go through that and find out what he was putting together th
from ghana. in ghana, there was this project where ghana got close to $500 million for a highway. these are some of the things that the u.s. government can do to help the continent, especially the subregion. a vacuum? does it leave an opening for groups like al qaeda to come in ? guest: there are lots of reasons for american you should. there are limits to what america can do. we are looking at the limits in the face now with the fiscal cliff, which we have delayed a little bit. we have to reckon with it. within that context, we have to look at where our aid can have the most good affect. in mali, our loss to not permit us to deal with governments that come to power through extraconstitutional means. we have the case of the crew -- coup still pulling strings behind the scenes. it is a matter of military effectiveness. in order to win in northern mali, an outsider will have to engage in a counterinsurgency campaign. taking the people in the north. many have legitimate grievances for political marginalization and discrimination. that allowed the opening for al qaeda and the other i
over the world. as i said, to india, ghana and all these places to try to get material. and people were telling me that you know, she has some papers under her bed, or in our house. and so part of what i tell in this, this gradual process by which again access to those materials. >> host: how did you do at? because if she hadn't -- >> guest: and it took time. >> host: and they are valuable. she had them in her home a. >> guest: that was part of it, is that when dexter king decided that he was going -- >> host: now, he is the younger son of dr. king lacks. >> guest: he is the older -- the younger son, yes, yes, i'm sorry. >> host: two sons and two daughters. >> guest: that's right. he was the younger son who decided he wanted to bring them all together and put them up for auction. and so at that point the question became well, you know, what's going to happen with all the papers in the home? and that's when i began to go through all those materials. and i found that they were extremely rich. i mean, they opened up a whole new dimension about martin luther king because they had to do with
become clairvoyant duri. today, not so good. mali and ghana play today. >> i want to make one night. turn on your microphone to speak. when you are finished, lee's turn it off duri. .- ways turn it off here an >> thank you. ghana just played mali. thank you, general. likely question is mali was part of the counterterrorism program for the past eight years. as we can see, last year mali has had to gold problems. -- difficult problems. the program is designed to strengthen african militaries. it does not seem to have worked very well in mali. my question is, in the washington, you say you're going to expand to other african countries and train them t. why give medicine to more people than the one person who took it certainly has not recovered? it could be argued that they are doing worse. when i bring africa to the u.s. ? i know a lot of africans are anxious about this. >> the question about mali is a fair question. the kernel probably has some more insight on this. we have had a u.s. training effort with the mali forces for some number of years. some of that has occurred in mali and some o
and her husband--several years, i'm sorry--spent in ghana. and this is one of those--those big things in african community, the sort of going back to africa. and, you know, just how emotional it was and how that changed them in their perception of america and africa. c-span: and nell painter was there with them, was with her parents. >> guest: nell joined them for a while, too, yes, yes. c-span: i know because we talked about that. >> guest: yes. c-span: and what did they--after being in africa, did they have any different conclusions than the other people you talked to about being black and in america? >> guest: well, i mean, i think they had a deeper appreciation for what the entire diaspora--diaspora means and that whole experience is. i mean, they, you know, realized that there were tremendous cultural differences between africa and america and so she--ms. painter and then mr. --i'm sorry, ms. irvin--mrs. irvin and mr. irvin, you know, were very careful to point out the things that they shared with africans, how difficult, you know, culturally, it is to be united, and yet, you kno
of ghana made his announcement and then didn't follow-up it hasn't taken a lead, we've had people filling that vacuum, whose mission is one of stirring up fear in their own personal political motive, not because they genuinely believe it. >> misses last year's that it's been that long. i was driving and heard on npr and there was a story about someone being imprisoned in cuba and it was unfair and it was unfair and i thought it was going to be a story about one time though and it is about alan gross, an american citizen in prison in cuba and our government is very good. and there have not be for the hackers that were picked to were really good about how dare you hold an american citizen and insisting that it's a violation of the rule of law and you can't do this, yet we've got people that are spent more than a decade in prison because of their citizenship, they they are not here to be punished. they are here because of their citizenship and i would imagine the public, the right wing airbags on the radio and television would be pitching a fit if americans were held as of their citizenship
in thai you would call them grengjai. that weird noise you make when you bite a spicy pizza. in ghana, fulenti, means to move hot food around in your mouth. >> brian: i'll try to add that into my everyday verbiage. good news, bad news story. good news, the girlfriend is not dead. the bad news is, the story we thought about her and the being the girlfriend of manti te'o is also not true because she's not alive. he played the game even though his grandmother passed away, which is true. and his girlfriend passed away within six hours of each other. it was a story in which sports illustrated picked up. became world wide news where he played with such anguish and played so well with 12 tackles as the fighting irish beat michigan state and then played against michigan the following week. little did we know, none of what i just said was true, except for the fact that i'm saying what i now know is true, that that wasn't true. pick up the story, i dare you! >> steve: the picture we are showing folks is the picture that he believed was the girl who he had a three-year relationship with. she was
lots of smart investors looking at places like nigeria, looking at ghana, looking at other markets that historically have been offputting for people, but now right on the agenda. >> richard, thank you. going to keep it shore. thanks for your time today. >> thank you. >>> coming, a bullish case tore 2013. stocks getting off to a strong start yesterday. plus, news about al gore and al jazeera ra. what is that all about? >> i know. of buttons on your tablet. isn't it time the automobile advanced? introducing cue in the all-new cadillac xts. the simplicity of a tablet has come to your car. ♪ the all-new cadillac xts has arrived. and it's bringing the future forward. at farmers, we make you smarter about insurance. because what you don't know can hurt you. what if you didn't know that boxes by the curb... make you a target for thieves? or that dog bites account for a third of all home liability claims? what if you didn't know that one in seven drivers is uninsured? and that grease fires have to be smothered? the more you know, the better you can plan for whats ahead. get smarter about
, south africa; nairobi, kenya; accra, ghana; new york city; atlanta, georgia; jackson, mississippi; or memphis, tennessee the cry is always the same "we want to be free." [applause] and another reason that i'm happy to live in this period is that we have been forced to a point where we're going to have to grapple with the problems that men have been trying to grapple with through history, but the demand didn't force them to do it. survival demands that we grapple with them. men, for years now, have been talking about war and peace. but now, no longer can they just talk about it. it is no longer a choice between violence and nonviolence in this world; it's nonviolence or nonexistence! [applause] that is where we are today. and also in the human rights revolution, if something isn't done, and done in a hurry, to bring the colored peoples of the world out of their long years of poverty, their long years of hurt and neglect, the whole world is doomed. [applause] now, i'm just happy that god has allowed me to live in this period, to see what is unfolding. allowedhappy that he's me to be
visited ghana in 2009. he stated that in the long run, it is africans who are best able and as capable of addressing paprikas challenges. that often gets convinced index shorthand of african solutions to african problems, but it is an important principle. secretary clinton expanded on president obama's views and said yes, african solutions for african problems, but increasingly, global problems require african solutions as well. i think what secretary clinton was getting at is that africa is no longer isolated. africa is part of a broader, global community, and the african countries have a role to play and have contributions to make. so those principles are quite important for us as we think about what is that we are supposed to do on behalf of our country. we are guided also by to overarching documents, united states government documents that help shape our activities. the first is the presidential policy directive on sub-saharan africa. it outlines the u.s. government of the policy and strategy toward africa. it is based on four pillars. the first, to promote opportunity and developm
's recent release ghana violance package she issued three provisions. one clarifying for medicaid managed care plan and one saying that it would be included in the final health benefits rule, and the one that committed to issues in the final rule on the mental health care of the addiction equity act which is mentioned. but it didn't made clear and you haven't made clear when we are actually going to see that to be if these plans are supposed to be ready to go into exchange starting in october it is really essentials that we see a final rule on this before april. so, let me go back to the question senator harkin asked again and ask you to be specific about the date that we will see the final rule in place. >> thank you, senator murray. i think the president's proposals indicated that the essentials health benefits rule would be out next month. we are working on the final parity and will go through the regulatory process and is in that process now. i can't give you a specific final day. >> by april? >> i can't tell you precisely what the data is, but we are on it now. >> it is really essent
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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